Mackay Leading Qld in Solar Installation

Multi-purpose solar car park in Spain.“We make it great in the Sunshine State!” went the old Queensland Government slogan in the 1970s and we are certainly doing a great job of using our sunshine in Mackay.

The worldwide demand for solar power has been growing exponentially in the past few years as the efficiency of panels has increased and production costs have fallen.

Here in Mackay more property owners are realising the benefits of solar power than anywhere else in Queensland.

In 2015 more rooftop solar was installed on properties in the 4740 postcode than in any other place in Australia, except Coondalup in Western Australia.

There was a decline in installations in Mackay compared with 2014 when we were by far the most solar savvy people in Australia, adding 5.9 megawatts of solar panels to our city’s roofs.

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Urannah Dam is for mining not agriculture

Irwin_Turtle_2.jpgUrannah Dam has been in the news a lot over the past year. Politicians have been talking up the proposal as a potential source of new water for agricultural land around Bowen. However, there are serious questions about whether farmers will ever see a drop of any water from this dam.

The Urannah Creek west of Eungella range is a beautiful place that has considerable environmental values. Its water flows into the Broken River and then into the Burdekin.It is home to the Irwin’s Turtle a unique species that was discovered in 1990 by Steve Irwin’s father Bob. 

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Bat Baby On Board!

Black_Flying_Fox_-_James_Niland.jpgWith female Black Flying-foxes giving birth and raising their young, we are again seeing an increase in numbers at several roosts around Mackay. The females elect to give birth in areas where there will be an abundant food supply while their young are dependent and learning to fly.

When first born, the young cling to their mothers belly fur as she flies out to feed at night. When they become a bit heavier, they are left to “creche” in the roost at night, with adult females often returning through the night to check on the creche, and to feed their own young. At about three months of age, the juveniles will begin to test their wings with short flights from the roost but continue to feed from their mother.

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Let’s make 2016 the year we clean up the mining mess

mtmorgan-30.jpegIt’s no surprise that mining creates a few environmental problems. One of the big ones is the costly exercise of restoring land after mining operations cease.

Across Queensland there are over 15,000 abandoned mines where work has stopped and no person or company can be legally required to restore the site. When that happens, the Queensland government must take action to make the site safe, both to the public and the environment.

At Mount Morgan, acid water leaches from the former gold mine into the Dee River, making the stream unfit for swimming, fishing and drinking for many kilometres. The government is trying to stabilise the Mount Morgan mine but it’s costing a fortune and no end date is in sight.
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Enjoy the Reef the Right Way

Maori Wrasse and snorkellorsExperiencing the Great Barrier Reef is on everybody’s bucket list.

After all, it is the most spectacularly diverse ecosystem on the planet.

The Reef is so big that you can see it from the surface of the moon.

It is home to tens of thousands of animals with over 1600 species of fish from Nemo to Jaws, including many vulnerable and endangered species.

But there are right ways and wrong ways to experience the Reef and, when it comes to fish, fish ‘framing’ is the wrong way.

Fish ‘framing’ involves dangling some form of bait such as fish heads or carcasses into the water to attract large fish to the surface and sometimes right out of the water and onto the deck for a photo opportunity.

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Mackay welcomes international air travellers

Bar Tailed GodwitWe all love Mackay’s beaches as a place to relax and have fun. But how often do we think of them as a home for birds?

Thousands of shorebirds depend on them, either to nest or to feed on. And as more and more of us use the beach for recreation, we need to be careful how we do it.

Our beaches host two main groups of shorebirds: ones which live here all year round and nest on the beach, such as Red-capped Plovers, and migratory shorebirds, such as Bar-tailed Godwits, which arrive from their northern hemisphere breeding grounds at the start of our summer, to fatten up by feeding on our tidal flats.

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People's Climate March

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People's Climate March

8.30am Sunday November 29

Jubilee Park

Cnr Wellington & Alfred Sts

Mackay

Join thousands of Australians as we march for a transition to clean energy, for secure job creation, for a healthy environment and a safe climate.

In the last weekend of November, will you help create the biggest climate march the world has ever seen? 

 

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MCG welcomes legal action

Mackay Conservation Group welcomes ACF Legal Action

Mackay Conservation Group has welcomed the announcement today that the Australian Conservation Foundation will challenge the approval of the Adani Carmichael mine.

The Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) has several grounds on which it is appealing the Federal Government's approval of the mine.

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Town Beach Beautiful Walk

Last weekend we took a little walk along the northern end of Town Beach to a part of the coast not often visited. It is a small part of the coastline that shows what the shoreline looked like before the extensive modifications in the 1960s. Once again our volunteer experts were a great asset, explaining the relationships between different aspects of the environment.

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30th Birthday and AGM

Last Saturday, Mackay Conservation Group supporters ascended onto the Surf Lifesaving Club to celebrate our thirtieth birthday. Committee members (past and present), members, staff, volunteers and supporters met for a dinner to remember the good old days and celebrate the many campaigns the MCG has under its belt. The first president of the Conservation group attended as well as the current president, Michael Williams, who was awarded a life membership. 

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