Possibilities for our region

Humans are capable of amazing things. Our ingenuity is limitless.

This month marks 50 years since humans first set foot on the moon. In 1969, only 8 years after President J F. Kennedy announced a national goal of landing on the moon

Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took their “giant leap for mankind”. This amazing feat was accomplished with only a fraction of the technology that we have access to today.

 

 It is incredible how fast technology has evolved since then, and it’s amazing what we can achieve once we set our minds on a goal.

 Imagine the amazing things that humanity could accomplish in the future. 

Now consider the huge threat our own behaviour is having on our very existence. Is our love of coal and burning fossil fuels worth limiting our potential and worth limiting the time that earth is even habitable? 

The great thing is that we don’t have to cook the planet in order to have our modern conveniences. We have the technology we need to move on from burning coal and other fossil fuels. We now have this amazing opportunity to take advantage of the exciting possibilities that using renewable energy technologies can open up. Renewable energy can run all the electrical things that coal fired power can. With good renewable energy systems, we can actually have more power for less money, which will improve the profitability and productivity of most businesses. 

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Introducing Imogen Clark - Our new reef water quality campaigner!

 

Hello,

My name is Imogen and I have just started working at the Mackay Conservation Group as a ‘Reef Campaigner’.  I am from London and upon graduating from University in England last year, I have moved to Australia to pursue a career in marine conservation.

I learnt many things during my time at university, but one thing that completely resonated with me was the importance and beauty of the coral reefs, and how they provide such crucial habitats for a variety of marine organisms, as well as providing us with bioprospecting properties and a large economic input via tourism.  The reef is valued at $56bn, provides 64 000 jobs and over $6 bn directly to the Australian economy.  However, unfortunately the Great Barrier Reef is being destroyed, largely due to climate change and water pollution from excess sediments, nutrients and pesticides entering the waterways.

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Adani demands CSIRO scientists’ names: Mackay Conservation Group raises concerns

Media Release
16 July 2019

Adani demands CSIRO scientists’ names: Mackay Conservation Group raises concerns


The Mackay Conservation Group says Adani should be investigated following revelations that the company requested the identities of CSIRO scientists involved in assessing the mining giant’s groundwater management plan (ABC today, Adani demands names of CSIRO scientists reviewing groundwater plans).

Mackay Conservation Group spokesperson, Michael Kane, says “Adani’s actions are clearly designed to intimidate people who work for some of Australia’s most trusted institutions and organisations, including the CSIRO and Geocsience Australia.

“All Australians should be concerned about international corporations applying undue pressure on our independent regulators, regardless of whether they support Adani’s Carmichael project or not.

“If there was a federal anti-corruption body this would be exactly the kind of conduct it would be responsible for examining.

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Intercept Mackay's Marine Debris, 4th July 2019

Did you know that many of Mackay's drains in the CBD have litter traps? This is netting or mesh designed to catch rubbish and debris before it washes into the ocean. Pioneer Catchment & Landcare Group Inc., Mackay Regional Council, Reef Catchments and the Cleanwater Group are auditing these traps and you can help!

By sorting and recording what washes into the drains, Mackay Council can better understand what type of rubbish and attitudes they need to focus on changing.

This child-friendly event is on Thursday 4th July, from 12 - 2:30pm at Jubilee Park.

For more information and to RSVP, click here!

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Worldwide movement to declare Climate Emergencies

🚨 A fast-growing number of countries, nations, territories and cities are accepting the science and declaring climate emergencies. 🚨

This includes entire countries of the UK, Canada and Portugal and the nations of Scotland, Ireland and Wales. The City Councils of London, New York and Auckland have also joined the list.

In Australia, 25 areas have declared climate emergencies including the Australian Capital Territory and the city councils of Sydney, Hobart and Fremantle. 

So what exactly is a climate emergency declaration? And will it mean climate action?

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Source your electricity from local renewable projects today

Many of us are keen to reduce our environmental impact and do our best but with limited access to public transport, bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, coal and gas dominating energy production and suburban sprawl making us dependent on our cars it can seem hard to significantly reduce our carbon footprint.

There are of course clean energy alternatives like purchasing rooftop solar and battery storage but many people simply can’t afford it, live in unsuitable homes or rent and don’t get a say about how their electricity is sourced.

However, there are affordable options for electricity consumers to switch to renewable energy no matter where you live.

For example. Mackay’s sole energy retailer Ergon Energy customers can source between 10 to 100% of their electricity from renewable sources by participating in Ergon Energy’s ‘Clean Energy Programme’.

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Adani is just the tip of the melting iceberg

Environmental organisations such as Mackay Conservation Group have focused on preventing the Adani mine from being constructed for several years. We have built a movement of two million people around the country who support organisations that are part of the Stop Adani alliance. That leads some people to wonder why we aren’t focussed on the other mines planned for the Galilee Basin and elsewhere.

In 2012 it appeared that the first cab off the rank would be the GVK-Hancock Alpha mine. It attracted a lot of attention from the environmental movement. That project hasn’t gone anywhere, while Adani has been eyeing off opportunities to open its mine with generous support from taxpayers including low-interest loans and special royalties deals.

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Join us to Stop Adani

Because of people like you, we have stopped coal being dug up from the Galilee Basin for 7 years. 

The Stop Adani movement has only been around since early 2017 after Matt Canavan threw $1 billion at the project, and Annastacia Palaszczuk declared the project ‘critical infrastructure’.

People power stopped that loan and forced Australia’s big 4 banks and over 50 financial institutions, insurers and contractors to rule out supporting the project.

There are still many approvals left until Adani can dig up coal. And with your help, we can win.

Join our community to take action on climate change and move Australia beyond coal!

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Media release: Adani's water approval goes against science

13 June 2019

Queensland Government has ignored science by giving away water to Adani

Mackay Conservation Group has today condemned the Queensland Government’s approval of Adani’s Groundwater plan. The group expressed disappointment that the government had given in to bullying by the billionaire mining company and ignored the science, risking Queensland’s water.

Mackay Conservation Group community organiser Emma Barrett said“Today’s decision has ignored expert warnings that Adani’s mine could permanently damage Queensland’s groundwater. Leading water scientists tell us that Adani’s modelling is flawed, not fit for purpose and risks drying up the ecologically important Doongmabulla Springs.

The Doongmabulla Springs is home to four endangered plant and animal species including birds, herbs and grasses.

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Time to Stop Rubbishing Our Oceans

Tomorrow (June 8) is World Oceans Day, so it’s time to consider the big blue bits that cover 70 per cent of our Earth’s surface. We know that our oceans are being damaged by human activity including overfishing, mining and dumping of waste. Together we can protect and restore our oceans.

Plastic waste is accumulating in huge garbage patches that will remain in the oceans for decades or even centuries. The garbage patch in the Pacific Ocean is almost as big as Queensland. There are over 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic floating in the world’s oceans, that’s more than 600 items for every single human alive today. 

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