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Pages tagged "climate"

More to do to #StopAdani

#StopAdani is undeniably a hugely powerful movement. 

At the end of 2017, the wins were coming thick and fast; 

  • The Queensland Labor government retained power, with huge influence coming from the promise of vetoing the $1billion taxpayer loan to Adani.
  • They held their promise and blocked the loan. 
  • Four Chinese banks, some of the biggest banks in the world, plus the Chinese embassy, refused to support Adani.
  • Downer, who was contracted to build Adani's mine, walked away. 

All of these wins happened because our movement has grown so strong. 

But - it's not over yet. 

Adani is looking down the barrel of a huge stranded asset, so will do everything it can to push the Carmichael mine ahead. 

The mine proposal is Adani's best chance of replacing its current coal-handling contracts, which are set to finish up in the next five years. Without ongoing contracts, Adani's Abbot Point coal port will be in real trouble. 

There is also the possibility of Aurizon building an alternative rail line that could service the Carmichael mine and the rest of the Galilee Basin. 

Adani is not done yet - and neither are we. 

Already this year we have seen the price of renewable energy in India become cheaper than coal-powered energy, with minsters and leaders in India committing to rapidly reducing use of coal-power

India was set to start the next coal boom - and instead we're seeing the country emerge as a renewable energy powerhouse. 

With the vast majority of countries signing onto the Paris Agreement, we're seeing the fossil fuel industry declining. In the near future, there will be no market for the thermal coal that Adani so desperately wants, and Australia will have to deal with the mess left behind. 

Mackay suffers when it puts all of its eggs in one [mining] industry's basket. Time and time again we hear pleas from the community for a diversification of our region's economy, so that we rely on highly fluctuating industries. Coal is coming to an end - and Adani is not the answer for Mackay. 

That's why this year it is so important that we continue to grow and strengthen our movement. 

Let's work together to strengthen regional Queensland for generations to come. 

We can't stop (and we won't stop) until we #StopAdani forever.

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Read more from Market Forces and the #StopAdani Alliance


ABC 4 CORNERS EXPOSES ADANI

adani_exposed_final.pngThis week, ABC 4 Corners exposed the web of opaque company structures,  dodgy dealings, environmental vandalism and political protection that surrounds Adani’s operations in India.
 
You can watch the program on IView if you missed it!
 
Adani denies everything, and while they are currently under investigation in India for money laundering, tax evasion and price gouging, allegations similar to these have been investigated in the past and all charges have disappeared before penalties were imposed.
 
Adani is a company that seems to wield undue influence over the police, customs and politicians in India.  We cannot allow this behaviour to infect our political system here.  
Already Adani has been given free water, royalty free coal and wants a $1 billion loan.  We want to save the Great Barrier Reef, and protect our climate.  Our aims are incompatible with Adani in Australia.
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Media Release: Report finds Adani polluted sensitive wetlands

33962498356_dd790646b7_z.jpgMackay Conservation Group says a new Queensland Government report confirms Adani’s coal terminal has polluted the nationally significant Caley Valley wetlands during Cyclone Debbie and shows the company cannot be trusted to operate a mine, rail and port operation in Queensland.

A report commissioned by the Queensland Department of Environment & Heritage Protection (DEHP), which relied on samples taken four weeks after the cyclone, has found up to 10 per cent of sediment in the wetlands near Adani’s Abbot Point coal terminal was actually coal that the company allowed to leave its site. This follows Adani being fined $12,900 for polluting the Reef coast. Adani is currently challenging the fine in court.

Mackay Conservation Group coordinator, Peter McCallum, who visited the contamination site at the invitation of DEHP to observe the contamination first hand, said “It was clear to me that there was coal everywhere we looked when we visited the site a month after Cyclone Debbie. This report confirms those observations and makes clear that Adani is not fit to operate a massive coal project in Queensland,” Mr McCallum said.

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Mackay says No to Adani

A community survey released today by the Mackay Conservation Group has uncovered overwhelming opposition in Mackay to the Adani Carmichael mine and the special treatment it is receiving from the government.

Almost 80 per cent of Mackay people do not support the $1 billion taxpayer funded loan to Adani. Even greater numbers (86 per cent) oppose the Queensland government giving Adani access to free, unlimited water. Eighty-five per cent of people were also opposed to the royalty free period that the State government has granted to Adani.

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All of the graphs and figures are available here.

You can join the Stop Adani movement right here in Mackay! Find out how you can get involved and help to protect our land, water and air for generations to come!

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Parliament calling for submissions!

climate_built.jpgParliament is inviting individuals and organisations to make a submission to help strengthen and support their inquiry into the current and future impacts of climate change on our built environment.

As temperatures rise to levels unprecedented in human existence, it is questionable if Australia’s current housing, building and infrastructure will withstand the predicted climatic changes and the extreme weather events that it will entail.

From the recent devastation of cyclone Debbie, causing approximately $2 billion of damages to private and public infrastructure, to the life shattering impacts of the 2008 floods leaving nearly two thousand residents and businesses inundated with water, the Mackay community is definitely no stranger to the costly wrath of Mother Nature.

With various climatic scenarios predicted, you can help support the resilience of the region by making a submission. Sharing your opinions and proposals will greatly assist the Mackay community, and beyond, to be more adaptable and manageable in the face of an inevitably changing future.

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Water is life

Stop Adani Mackay and the Mackay Conservation Group joined groups from across Australia in a #waterislife roadside protest last weekend. 

In drought stricken Queensland, water is one of our most precious resources, and the Adani Carmichael mine directly threatens the water sources that thousands of farmers and regional communities rely on. 

With a track record of environmental destruction in India, the Adani company cannot be trusted with our water. 

Water is life - and Mackay locals are going to keep fighting to protect Queensland's water!

If you would like to keep up to date with Stop Adani Mackay, like their Facebook Page or contact Maggie on 0434837774 or by emailing [email protected] 


Adani and Qld Government conceal dodgy deal on royalties

As you would have seen in the media, the Qld Government is making dodgy deals with Adani. The new deal on royalties is being kept hidden from the public. QueensladaniQLDGOV.jpeganders are not being told the details of this deal, let alone how much it is going to cost them.

Prior to the 2015 election, the current Qld Government promised that "Adani must ensure its project is viable in an open, competitive marketplace. Labor will not do any secret deals." But yesterday the Qld premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, did just that, she signed a secretive royalties deal that could cost the State hundreds of millions of dollars in public funds, dressed as a ‘loan’ for the first five years of the mine’s operation, in Central Queensland. How much Adani is expected to pay and how much they will actually pay back, is in a realm of uncertainty. Exactly what this deal entails, only Adani and the Qld Government knows.

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Solar Makes Sense for Business

business_rooftop_solar.pngSome of our regional businesses have invested in rooftop solar energy and are reaping the rewards. Langfords Hotel, Porters Cannonvale, MacDonald & Murphy are among the businesses that are benefiting from solar installations. 

Most businesses in Mackay use most of their electricity during daylight hours so solar is a great option. Large users of electricity are slugged with an extra tariff, called a demand charge, when they exceed a threshold average consumption per month. By installing solar they can reduce average consumption and avoid the extra tariff. Even small businesses can cut electricity bills to almost zero by installing solar.

It makes real economic sense for all businesses to consider renewable energy. The investment will pay for itself in five or six years and most installations are guaranteed for 20 years. There are many great environmental reasons to consider installing solar power but the economics alone should be enough to convince you. However there is a long way to go to make our businesses ecologically friendly.

Sign our 100% renewable energy petition to Malcolm Turnbull

 


MCG Supports Mining Jobs

2010_0410063.jpgMackay Conservation Group supports a Queensland mining project worth at least $7.3 billion that has been approved by the state government and the mining companies involved have already committed to. Sound a bit weird? It’s not really, the project is mine rehabilitation. 

The Queensland government currently holds over $7 billion in Financial Assurance to fund the clean-up of mines if mining companies fail. We estimate that that level of funding would easily create 2,000 direct jobs for ten years and many could commence today if rehabilitation was undertaken progressively rather than waiting until mining is completed. The reality is however that mining companies have been delaying mine rehabilitation and, in some cases, have no plan to rehabilitate land at all.

Across Queensland there are 220,000 hectares disturbed by mining operations but only 556 hectares that have been fully rehabilitated. Today, only one twelfth of mined land has had some rehabilitation work done. In 2006 that figure was one third.

The Queensland Government has recently issued two discussion papers on mine rehabilitation. They are the first of six papers that will be released for public comment in coming months. Mackay Conservation Group and Lock the Gate have been working on reforming the mine rehabilitation sector since 2015. We have raised questions about the extent and quality of rehabilitation in public and in private discussions with government, academics and the mining industry. The papers look at the method of funding bonds paid by mining companies and the way that rehabilitation is planned.

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Adani hides evidence of pollution at Abbot Point

IMG_0495_small.jpgAdani is actively hiding the truth about its coal-pollution of the Caley Valley Wetlands that occurred during Cyclone Debbie, says Mackay Conservation Group’s Coordinator who last week visited the area, accompanied by independent and government scientists and departmental staff, at the invitation of the office of the Queensland Environment Minister Mr Steven Miles.

Coordinator of the Mackay Conservation Group, Mr Peter McCallum said,  “Last week we observed coal pollution in the sediment in the sensitive Caley Valley Wetlands, on the edge of the wetlands and on the floor of the wetlands, and in the area close to the spillway where the discharge occurred from the secondary settlement pond.

“Unfortunately, the site visit was very tightly managed by Adani and North Queensland Bulk Ports to stop us gathering photographic evidence, despite an assurance before the visit that we would be able to take photos and collect samples.

“NQBP staff told us on entry that we could not take photos, collect samples or leave the group to explore the site. They warned that if we breached these conditions we’d be immediately escorted off the site and deposited alone, on the side of the isolated Bruce Highway.

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